November 17, 2009

Wild Game Stew

A while back, I posted of Camp Stew made from leftover BBQ meats. Today’s stew is a bit different. Hunting season is gearing up around here with dove and quail hunters getting their best shots in. Duck season starts a little later while geese hunters get one more crack after November 27. Turkey season is only open in a few counties; the state favors most areas during the spring, not fall. Deer will soon be running for cover as hunters stalk and chase, sometimes with dogs, on private or leased lands. Hunt clubs abound throughout the state for this one reason. Nevertheless, many wild animals have been chased around since early September like opossum and raccoon, not that I know of any hunters for these. Today’s recipe is for local hunters and those who seek big game too, and is for a tasty, true hunt camp stew. It is what I imagine one would eat if really living off the land. There are no quantities in this recipe – cook what you need. For city dwellers, it’s a great meal when combining neighbors and friends wild game too, just raid their freezers and invite them to some fine eating. Enjoy!

Wild Game Stew

Boned game meat
Salt and pepper to taste
Worcestershire sauce
Garlic pods
Canned tomatoes, undrained
Canned whole kernel corn, drained
Cubed Potatoes
Sliced onions
Sliced carrots

Any wild game works here – deer, squirrel, dove, quail, turkey, bear, elk, moose, wild hog, possum, coon – just about anything (except goat, it will stink up the place)

If frozen, thaw the meat and cut into cubes. Place in a stockpot, cover with water and season with salt, pepper, garlic and liberal amount of Worcestershire. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to a simmer cooking for an hour. Add the vegetables and simmer for 3 to 5 hours. After a couple of hours, sample the stew and season to taste with additions seasonings if desired.

Recipe from Dr. Sidney Taylor and from my hometown in Greenville AL

11 comments :

  1. There are plenty of hunters around here - maybe I should go raid some of their freezers so I can make this stew. Sounds delicious! However, I think I"ll pass on the squirrel.

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  2. Deer is plentiful now that the mating season is in full swing, and I have a few squirrels in the back yard that the dogs would like to make a meal of.

    Looks like a perfect Dutch oven or cast iron pot on the campfire kind of recipe too!

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  3. I love venison stew, this is a good all-purpose recipe to have ingredients on-hand depending on what the catch is!

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  4. Here in California we have hunters too - it may not seem like it to the rest of the world, but there ARE normal people in the Great Golden State :-) I love hunting and game meat - duck and all cervids of course. Have you got a favorite venison sausage recipe to share?

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  5. HMMMmm Possum eh? I have those critters running in the alley of my apartment all the time. My friend hunts all the time but I dont think he ever brings back any meat though :( But this stew sounds awesome MMMmm hearty stew would be perfect right now

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  6. I love all types of game meat, especially deer and wild boar meat. My mom was very good in cooking them with all the various spices and again she never record her recipes :( ....everything by her powerful tongue to taste

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  7. I once was having a conversation with someone in New Orleans about food (what else?) and he revealed that he ate nutria. Incredulous, I asked, "Is it any good?" And like a true New Orleanian, he replied, "If you cook it right!" So there you go.

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  8. Wild game is something I so adore and haven't had in years! Your stew sounds wonderful, my mouth is watering. I would say thanks but now I'll have this craving forever(jk) In all seriousness, all of the family hunters are gone now. I refuse to 'buy' wild game, that's not my idea of the real thing.... I remember fresh squirrel (from the woods to the pan) cooked in wine with onions and mushrooms.

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  9. This recipe reminds me of home and my great grandmother's venison. I am heading home to Pensacola in a few weeks and can't wait to have some good gulf seafood.

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  10. I wish I can experience fresh wild game! That would so awesome!

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  11. Hahah.. I've to agree with MaryMoh! Asian ladies used to cook with their tongue not with their measuring spoon. I'm using measuring spoon and also with my tongue!!! haha... So sorry, I'm not interested in game meat. Thank you.

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